Celestron GPC-102ED


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Subject: Re: vote by xxx.xxx.139.89
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.253.1)
Date: 12/13/2003 01:16:07 am PDT
>I just purchased this no longer available F/9 version ED scope with wood legs and the super polaris mount as "New Old Stock" from one of the major mail-order companies. It never fails, if you buy a scope, it will rain that first night. Anyway a few nights later, the sharpenss and fine detail on Jupiter, Mars and even Venus just blew away any view I have seen over the past 20 years with my 8" F/6 Reflector. Of course the image brightness and the "Image Scale" is not as good as the 8". The star test is perfect, and ABSOLUTELY NO FALSE COLOR!!!! I cant wait to test this scope again other "larger scopes" side by side at the next star party. What made me purchase a refractor?, I went to a star party 2 years ago with about 300 scopes, after looking a Jupiter in all types and sizes, it amazingly was a 60MM scope that had the best picture. Maybe not the most detail, but the most pleasing. I cant imagine why anywone would buy a SCT, since Refractors blow them away and they are not suited to deep sky observing. SVANH@TIR.COM

I've owned over 50 scopes and have never had a smaller scope beat a larger one on any object. I just did a side by side with 3 scopes. A MacCass, an SCT and a Tak 102. The SCT showed MUCH more detail on Saturn than the others.


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Subject: Refractors Rule!
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.16.157)
Date: 12/23/2003 03:55:14 pm PDT
I agree with you on the fact that refractors rule on planetary and lunar observing. I've also looked through alot of scopes including big reflectors. The big reflectors are great in dark skies on the "Faint Fuzzies". I had a Celestron 8" SCT and a 60mm refractor for awhile and I would put them side by side on Lunar and Planetary observing and I actually preferred the little refractor. It made me sorry I spent the money for the Celestron. At school we had 20" reflector and it was great on Messier objects and such but really on the planets and the moon it wasn't that much better than a small refractor. Jupiter through the 20" was a little bigger and clearer and brighter but much to my surprise not the improvement you would expect. I think if you can have only one scope in the city I would choose a 4" refractor and then if budget allows also have say a 10" Dob like the new Orion Skyquest with the Intelliscope computer controller if you could occassionally get out in the country. Autostar on the refractor would be nice also. That's how I feel right now!


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Subject: Re: vote by Staruser
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.36.52)
In Reply to: Staruser (Original Vote)
Date: 02/26/2011 02:12:31 am PDT
>The pinpoint stars are nice int this scope. But, the items you will see are very limited by the small size of lens. Do yourself a big favor and buy at least a 10in. or bigger scope with high quality optics. Remember the old rule of astronomy, the bigger the scope the more you will see! I have been to many star parties over my 20 years in astronomy and the big scopes always have the BIG lines behine them!! Save yourself some money and get a large scope now.

I totally disagree with this remark. in my suburban garden, with local light pollution, i have owned everything from 80mm short tube to 12 inch dob, and my most pleasing views have been in this celestron 102ED. You get crisp, sharp,contrasty views which you dont see in an SCT, or a big dob. size does dont always win, this gives beautiful images, and at public viewings I get the most compliments at the views in this scope. I'm keeping this and the 12 inch dob is sold!

don't be put off by comments like this one, if you can find one of these theyre a steal and so portable too!


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