Meade ETX-90EC


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Subject: Moved Message
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.135.22)
Date: 07/26/1998 03:22:03 pm PDT

Estoy interesado en comprar un Telescope Meade ETX con motor
incorporado.

Podrian darme precio CIF Valencia-Spain y el plazo de entrega?

Se podria realizar el porte por UPS?

El pedido se realizara por FAX y el pago se
hara con VISA.

Espero sus noticias.

Un saludo.

Jose Lajara

mariamac@ctv.es


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Subject: Moved Message
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.46.124)
Date: 11/24/1999 09:58:31 am PDT
The ETX's optics are great, and so is the price. But it isn't the only 3.5 inch package in town. I've looked through both ETX optics and Celestron's G3, (which, despite the shorter focal length does not have a larger central obstruction.) I couldn't tell the difference (though I'm not an expert on such things) -- both gave crisp, sharp images. The G3 comes with an equatorial mount (including full length tripod,) and a clock drive, and it's less than or around $600 -- People who think the ETX is a deal ought to check out the G3.


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Subject: Moved Message
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.73.84)
Date: 12/17/2001 10:34:47 am PDT
Many of us grew up and got into astronomy in the pre-computerized GOTO age. Funny -- somehow we managed to find everything. Ever heard of setting circles? They do still work, you know. Oh -- but it takes a little thought and you've got to be able to add and subtract. That's right -- I guess our youngsters are too dumb to think for themselves anymore. We've gotta press that button for instant gratification.

The Orion Starmax 127 gives you two whole inches more aperture -- a very big leap in light-gathering power -- and costs only $539 with a tripod. Learn how to star hop and use setting circles and save a cool $200 on a scope that gathers 200 percent more light than the puny plastic ETX.


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Subject: Re: vote by xxx.xxx.75.15
By: SanDiego123
In Reply to: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.75.15) (Original Vote)
Date: 01/14/2002 10:31:50 am PDT
Hi!

Very interesting article. I have an 8 ich Schmidt-Cassegrain which I found it some times too cumbersome to take out and set up. I bought the ETX-60 AT which is O.K. but limited in it's usability due to small aperture and limited focal length. I am becoming interested in the ETX-90 RA. I wonder if you could tell where you bought the scope from and how much it did cost you with the tripod.

Regards,
SanDiego123


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Subject: Re: vote by xxx.xxx.73.84
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.21.38)
Date: 08/25/2002 08:55:37 pm PDT
>Many of us grew up and got into astronomy in the pre-computerized GOTO age. Funny -- somehow we managed to find everything. Ever heard of setting circles? They do still work, you know. Oh -- but it takes a little thought and you've got to be able to add and subtract. That's right -- I guess our youngsters are too dumb to think for themselves anymore. We've gotta press that button for instant gratification.
>
>The Orion Starmax 127 gives you two whole inches more aperture -- a very big leap in light-gathering power -- and costs only $539 with a tripod. Learn how to star hop and use setting circles and save a cool $200 on a scope that gathers 200 percent more light than the puny plastic ETX.

Anyone new to astronomy, "Pay not attention to the man behind the curtain." In this case, the old guy who walked 20 miles to school, uphill, both ways. He's not correct in his analysis, at all!

First off, he didn't find everything. Scopes with a computer can find so many celestial objects in one night it's unreal. If your doing it the ole fashion way, and you spend a night with someone with a good computer setup.....you'll be after your scope with a big sledge. So easy, so fast. You actually spend most of your time looking at the stars! What a concept!

Furhermore, guys like this forget to mention when it's overcast. Can see anything when it's overcast, right? Wrong! Sometimes you can still punch through and do some reasonable viewing. Try that with your setting circles!

Oh yeah, what about this scenario. Your camping, and a tree is blocking Polaris, and you can't see it. Or a tree is blocking many of the stars you usually use for alignment, and you don't have the coordinates with you for the ones you do see. That couldn't happen.... could it? How about your sitting in your backyard, and your house is blocking Polaris? One last scanario, your looking at the Ring Nebula, and you decide your going to crash for a few hours when Crab Nebula is in good position. You get up a few hours later, and guess what? You have to re-align your scope again. Oh, and guess what else? The star you used for alignmet is now behind a tree or has set, or for whatever reason is not in your field of view. Not fun! But if you have a computerized scope, you don't even need to realign!!! Push a couple of buttons and 5 seconds later you in awe of how amazing the "Crab" is that night.

If your new to Astronomy, and you will be going to a lot of places that don't have 360 degree viewing then computer are almost essential.


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Subject: Re: vote by xxx.xxx.73.84
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.58.204)
In Reply to: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.21.38) (Original Message)
Date: 08/30/2002 11:02:37 am PDT
Hi: I'm a newbie at astronomy but not stupid and I read your post on the "computerized" Orion Starmax 127 vs. the Meade ETX's. Could you specifically tell me which one you prefer?
Also, which computer software you are using...free or purchased & what are you using to drive (move) the scope.
You don't like the ETX's but one MUST have a computerized scope and still save money. Please explain?




>>Many of us grew up and got into astronomy in the pre-computerized GOTO age. Funny -- somehow we managed to find everything. Ever heard of setting circles? They do still work, you know. Oh -- but it takes a little thought and you've got to be able to add and subtract. That's right -- I guess our youngsters are too dumb to think for themselves anymore. We've gotta press that button for instant gratification.
>>
>>The Orion Starmax 127 gives you two whole inches more aperture -- a very big leap in light-gathering power -- and costs only $539 with a tripod. Learn how to star hop and use setting circles and save a cool $200 on a scope that gathers 200 percent more light than the puny plastic ETX.
>
>Anyone new to astronomy, "Pay not attention to the man behind the curtain." In this case, the old guy who walked 20 miles to school, uphill, both ways. He's not correct in his analysis, at all!
>
>First off, he didn't find everything. Scopes with a computer can find so many celestial objects in one night it's unreal. If your doing it the ole fashion way, and you spend a night with someone with a good computer setup.....you'll be after your scope with a big sledge. So easy, so fast. You actually spend most of your time looking at the stars! What a concept!
>
>Furhermore, guys like this forget to mention when it's overcast. Can see anything when it's overcast, right? Wrong! Sometimes you can still punch through and do some reasonable viewing. Try that with your setting circles!
>
>Oh yeah, what about this scenario. Your camping, and a tree is blocking Polaris, and you can't see it. Or a tree is blocking many of the stars you usually use for alignment, and you don't have the coordinates with you for the ones you do see. That couldn't happen.... could it? How about your sitting in your backyard, and your house is blocking Polaris? One last scanario, your looking at the Ring Nebula, and you decide your going to crash for a few hours when Crab Nebula is in good position. You get up a few hours later, and guess what? You have to re-align your scope again. Oh, and guess what else? The star you used for alignmet is now behind a tree or has set, or for whatever reason is not in your field of view. Not fun! But if you have a computerized scope, you don't even need to realign!!! Push a couple of buttons and 5 seconds later you in awe of how amazing the "Crab" is that night.
>
>If your new to Astronomy, and you will be going to a lot of places that don't have 360 degree viewing then computer are almost essential.


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Subject: Re: vote by xxx.xxx.73.84
By: webmaster
In Reply to: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.58.204) (Original Message)
Date: 08/30/2002 03:49:15 pm PDT
I think you misunderstood the quoting in the message. The user extolling the virtues of a computerized scope was replying to a user who obviously prefers the Starmax 127 over the ETX.
Click on the "original vote" or "original message" links to move up the message thread.


>Hi: I'm a newbie at astronomy but not stupid and I read your post on the "computerized" Orion Starmax 127 vs. the Meade ETX's. Could you specifically tell me which one you prefer?
>Also, which computer software you are using...free or purchased & what are you using to drive (move) the scope.
>You don't like the ETX's but one MUST have a computerized scope and still save money. Please explain?
>
>


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Subject: Re: vote by xxx.xxx.73.84
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.19.228)
In Reply to: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.58.204) (Original Message)
Date: 12/30/2003 10:56:19 pm PDT
>Hi: I'm a newbie at astronomy but not stupid and I read your post on the "computerized" Orion Starmax 127 vs. the Meade ETX's. Could you specifically tell me which one you prefer?
>Also, which computer software you are using...free or purchased & what are you using to drive (move) the scope.
>You don't like the ETX's but one MUST have a computerized scope and still save money. Please explain?
>
>
>
>
>>>Many of us grew up and got into astronomy in the pre-computerized GOTO age. Funny -- somehow we managed to find everything. Ever heard of setting circles? They do still work, you know. Oh -- but it takes a little thought and you've got to be able to add and subtract. That's right -- I guess our youngsters are too dumb to think for themselves anymore. We've gotta press that button for instant gratification.
>>>
>>>The Orion Starmax 127 gives you two whole inches more aperture -- a very big leap in light-gathering power -- and costs only $539 with a tripod. Learn how to star hop and use setting circles and save a cool $200 on a scope that gathers 200 percent more light than the puny plastic ETX.
>>
>>Anyone new to astronomy, "Pay not attention to the man behind the curtain." In this case, the old guy who walked 20 miles to school, uphill, both ways. He's not correct in his analysis, at all!
>>
>>First off, he didn't find everything. Scopes with a computer can find so many celestial objects in one night it's unreal. If your doing it the ole fashion way, and you spend a night with someone with a good computer setup.....you'll be after your scope with a big sledge. So easy, so fast. You actually spend most of your time looking at the stars! What a concept!
>>
>>Furhermore, guys like this forget to mention when it's overcast. Can see anything when it's overcast, right? Wrong! Sometimes you can still punch through and do some reasonable viewing. Try that with your setting circles!
>>
>>Oh yeah, what about this scenario. Your camping, and a tree is blocking Polaris, and you can't see it. Or a tree is blocking many of the stars you usually use for alignment, and you don't have the coordinates with you for the ones you do see. That couldn't happen.... could it? How about your sitting in your backyard, and your house is blocking Polaris? One last scanario, your looking at the Ring Nebula, and you decide your going to crash for a few hours when Crab Nebula is in good position. You get up a few hours later, and guess what? You have to re-align your scope again. Oh, and guess what else? The star you used for alignmet is now behind a tree or has set, or for whatever reason is not in your field of view. Not fun! But if you have a computerized scope, you don't even need to realign!!! Push a couple of buttons and 5 seconds later you in awe of how amazing the "Crab" is that night.
>>
>>If your new to Astronomy, and you will be going to a lot of places that don't have 360 degree viewing then computer are almost essential.

5-3.5= 2 whole inches? No!


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Subject: Meade Autostar Controller
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.103.230)
Date: 05/23/2004 05:00:00 pm PDT
I have never been able to get my 497 Autostar Controller to work. When I try to align it, after going through all the setup procedures, the controller says it's going to Sirius but ends up in the opposite direction. If I just humor it and tell it to align on the second star, it attempts to find Capella. Since it has rotated over 360 degrees most of the time, it usually just grinds away in its search for Capella.

I returned the controller to Meade, asking for a replacement since it never worked. Meade sent a controller back with the cryptic notation "repaired product" on the packing list. The "repaired product" does the same thing.

Others report that the controller is not easy to use. Can I get advice on how to make it work? It sounds like it would be lots of fun it did work.


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Subject: Re: Meade Autostar Controller
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.2.98)
In Reply to: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.103.230) (Original Message)
Date: 10/01/2004 11:26:42 am PDT
I know this post is from May, but you might be interested in my check list for my new ETX-70 Without reading the manual I decided to learn how it works... 3 nights later I got it.

In brief here are the steps:
1. Zero out the scope in a "rest" configuration.(OTA in horizontal postion)base declination at 0 (although I found my scope misaligned so it needs to be put at 2 degrees)
2. Point the scope to north (use a compass)
3. Level the scope (use a bubble level)
4. turn on auto star, add date/time.
5. pick first alignment star from menu. (scope will slew to approximate location).
6. Visually align star in center of eyepiece, then hit enter.
7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 for second star.
8. Computer calculates scope's true position
9. Go hunting!


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